Category Archives: Mama & The Hungry Hole

Review of Mama & the Hungry Hole

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“Mama & the Hungry Hole is the kind of New Gothic psychodrama that Shirley Jackson or young Ian McEwan or Patrick McGrath might have written. Its naturalism shades by degrees unpredictably into weirdness, and then back again, making you feel that the narrative territory under your feet is always unstable.”

Did he just compare me to Shirley Jackson? Gush.

Soooo, this review is from last year and I completely missed it, but it’s so lovely and sweet that I had to share it anyway. Now, I must search for other reviews I missed…

Check it out here at Locus Online as Paul di Filippo advocates for the novella.

Review of Mama & the Hungry Hole

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“Elise, Nana and Juanita are all strong women who I felt very connected to… I found the end to be moving and dramatic pulling together the many threads explored.”

Kate over at Proto Libro, a dedicated book reviewer who specializes in debut novels, took the time to add her thoughts about Mama & the Hungry Hole. Check it out here.

Short Movie Excerpt from Mama & the Hungry Hole

I wanted to do something a little different. Readings can be difficult to focus on, sometimes even dull. I wanted to change things up a bit. Though I wanted to do something multi-media, I also wanted to keep it simple and easy. So, I made a movie that was exclusive for the book tour, but now available to the public. This is an excerpt from my novella. It is one of three original fairy tales and told from a young child’s point-of-view.

Alice Out of Wonderland from Johanna DeBiase on Vimeo.

This Sweet Book Review

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I love this blog, Black, White & Read, which began as a self-challenge by one woman to read and review all the books represented on Gilmore Girls in the order that they appear. She is as funny as you might imagine considering the concept. Lucky for me, she got hold of a copy of my book and (having completed all the GG books) gave it this lovely review.

Book Launch at SOMOS

Jo-reading-1 Jo-reading-2 Jo-reading-3Had a great time at the book launch last week at SOMOS in Taos. It was an honor to read with such great authors as Iver Arnegard and Linda Michel-Cassidy. A couple of friends said it was the first reading they had ever been to. I guess if I can get people to come to a reading, I’ve done my job. These photos are by Micheal Benanav. The last one is of me watching the film I made exclusively for the book tour (in other words, you can’t see it anywhere else until after the tour). I was a little nervous about showing the film because it was different than what I usually do, but I think it worked out well and it looked cool on the big screen. In a few days I’ll be reading all by myself (a first?) in Denver at the BookBar.

denver reading

 

Mama & the Hungry Hole Now Available to Purchase!

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You can buy my book NOW in paperback or ebook! Check it out on Amazon. Hey, by the way, if you like it, consider giving it a good review on Amazon or Goodreads. I appreciate it. If you don’t like it, keep it to yourself; no one likes a complainer.

Official Book Trailer for Mama & the Hungry Hole

Interview with The Tishman Review

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People have started to read my book and with that, I have begun the process of having to answer questions about the book. One friend was so excited, that she started asking me questions before she even finished reading. I asked her to finish reading and then re-read the first chapter again. Well, she still had questions. A lot of them pertained to meaning. What did this or that mean? This interview at The Tishman Review might help to clear up some of her questions (or create more). It also covers information about writing craft and my writing process.

First Book Review!

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My first book review just came in by Linda Michel-Cassidy for Prick of the Spindle. She’s such a great writer and really got to the essence of the book. I love this:

“DeBiase uses the curious nature of this place well. The reader learns that here, anything could happen. And that ‘anything’ includes the terrible. It’s a daring thing to place matters of imminent concern within a speculative framework. It is equally risky to write from a child’s point of view with that character (unknowingly) assessing psychological states. And there is the tree as narrator—I was at first, suspicious of this tactic, but now I see that giving voice to an entity with physical and immediate detriment caused by the changing landscape makes sense. As DeBiase says of the mother, ‘It was strenuous work to sustain a vision, but worth it.'”

 

Interview in About.com/Fiction Writing

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Rachel Sherman interviews me about my new novella and publishing with a small press at fictionwriting.about.com.