Video Poem: 27 Bones

27 Bones from Johanna DeBiase on Vimeo.

Yoga For Writing: a podcast for miserable writers

Because aren’t all writers just a little bit miserable? Otherwise, we have to work hard not to be. I have some ideas of my own why this is, as well as some ideas about how not to be a miserable writer. This is not about the craft of writing or how to do yoga, it’s about how to use the philosophies of yoga to inspire and enliven your writing life or at least to be a little less miserable.

I’ve had this idea for a while to combine my two passions, writing and yoga. I plan to post a weekly episode.

You can find them on iTunes.
Or at the website here.
I’d love to hear what you think (but only if you think it’s awesome) Thanks for checking it out!

The Inaugural Taos Writers Conference

I am teaching an all-day intensive workshop at the inaugural, upcoming Taos Writers Conference. It’s called New Fiction for the Digital Age. With the onset of the internet and social media, narratives have taken on several new forms that break apart previous ideas of what a story should be. I will read examples and demonstrate through generative writing exercises ways in which we can experiment with traditional writing forms for the internet or print.

You can register here by March 1st: www.taoswritersconference.org

Literary Paris: Bookshops, Cafes and Cemeteries

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Before I traveled to Paris, I wondered what it was about the city of lights that so intrigued authors and stimulated so much writing for hundreds of years.  But after visiting, the mystery eluded me no longer. Paris is romantic. And I don’t mean it’s a great place to inspire love affairs and spark old flames, though it is. I mean romantic in the most prevailing way—mystical, exciting, exotic, fantastical. One can lose themselves in the narrow cobble-stoned side streets, the medieval architecture, the multitude of cafes and museums, the sparkling Eiffel Tower and the lights reflected on the flowing Seine. In Paris, there is endless inspiration.

This summer, for our 10th anniversary, my husband and I decided to take our first trip alone in eight years to Paris, the dreamiest place we could think of. Since we are both writers, I wanted to try to experience Paris the way ex-pat writers did back in the day. Of course, there were also a million other things we wanted to do. I realized that the best plan was to spend the morning writing in cafes and give our afternoons over to tourism. Continue Reading →

Short Story in Queen Mob’s Tea House

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A relatively new online literary journal on the scene, Queen Mob’s Tea House is fun, creative and progressive. I feel hipper (is that a word?) just being associated with them. The story they published, Aching Afterthoughts, has been through several incarnations to get to where it is. I think it is my most feminist piece of short fiction yet. It doesn’t hide behind metaphor. It’s a bit more in your face than I am accustomed to. In this way, I feel a bit more vulnerable putting it out there. I’m grateful to Queen Mob’s for supporting this work.

Review of Mama & the Hungry Hole

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“Mama & the Hungry Hole is the kind of New Gothic psychodrama that Shirley Jackson or young Ian McEwan or Patrick McGrath might have written. Its naturalism shades by degrees unpredictably into weirdness, and then back again, making you feel that the narrative territory under your feet is always unstable.”

Did he just compare me to Shirley Jackson? Gush.

Soooo, this review is from last year and I completely missed it, but it’s so lovely and sweet that I had to share it anyway. Now, I must search for other reviews I missed…

Check it out here at Locus Online as Paul di Filippo advocates for the novella.

Review of Mama & the Hungry Hole

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“Elise, Nana and Juanita are all strong women who I felt very connected to… I found the end to be moving and dramatic pulling together the many threads explored.”

Kate over at Proto Libro, a dedicated book reviewer who specializes in debut novels, took the time to add her thoughts about Mama & the Hungry Hole. Check it out here.

Short Story on Hayden’s Ferry Review

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This month, my short story, One Chance to Breathe, is featured on Hayden’s Ferry Review’s online Dock. First, it is such a great opportunity to be involved in such an excellent journal. Additionally, I get to be online. I mean, I love print as much as the next writer, but being online means I can share my story with, basically, everyone, including you, right now. This story was inspired by Ray Bradbury’s short story All Summer in the Day. It was also inspired by a true story, believe it or not, that I read in the news.

Video Poem on Atticus Review

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Super excited to announce that Atticus Review has published my video poem, When They Came For Us, on their website. This is my second video poem and both of them have found a home on the internet with literary journals. My first one, Threadbare, with Prick of the Spindle. This encourages me to create more video poems as more online journals are interested in multi-media forms. Also, it’s tons of fun.

Back in the Office

I didn’t quite finish NaNoWriMo. I made it to about 45000 words and the manuscript felt done, or maybe it was just me. Either way, I was done. I wrote this piece for Foreword Reviews half-way through my process. After  a short hiatus with my family to Mexico, I am back to work and in full gear. This article I wrote for Writer’s Digest, How and Why to Write Like a Pachyderm, was published over the holidays.

mango daquiri